A video showing an easy way to add a “deeply nostalgic” touch to your living room has gone viral on social media.

The home decoration hack was revealed in a video shared by Meg McMillin, a 36-year-old stay-at-home mom of two and one on the way. The lifestyle influencer and content creator is based in the suburbs of Chicago.

The clip has garnered 8.2 million views on Instagram (@megmcmillin_) and a million views on TikTok (@megmcmillin) since it was first posted in late February on both platforms.

A message overlaid on the TikTok video says: “Friendly reminder to start taking Polaroids and put them in a bowl on your coffee table.” The footage shows a living room setting with the bowl placed on a wooden table.

McMillin told Newsweek: “There are few things more exciting than taking a Polaroid and seeing how it turns out! I love the deeply nostalgic ‘moment in time’ feeling that they evoke. We are so used to having unlimited tries when it comes to taking pictures on our cell phones, so I really appreciate the authenticity that comes from an image that was only captured once.”

A caption shared with the TikTok post reads: “The way people love to go through them all when they’re over.”

The post comes as the Polaroid camera market has seen significant growth in recent years. The company filed for bankruptcy in 2001 following the rise of digital cameras.

This growth is driven by several key factors including “the resurgence of analog photography and vintage aesthetics,” which has led to an “increased demand for Polaroid cameras and films among consumers looking for unique and tangible ways to capture memories,” according to a report by MarkWide Research.

The rise of social media influencers and content creators looking for more engaging and visually appealing content to share on their platforms has also been driving the market. Polaroid’s ability to produce instant prints has helped meet the needs of a digital world of instant gratification, the report said.

‘Everything Is So Digitized Nowadays’

McMillin told Newsweek that the room shown in the viral clip is where her house guests often gather, so placing the Polaroids in “a pretty bowl” in this room “seemed obvious to me.”

“People love to sift through them and add to the bowl as well. My kids especially enjoy finding old pictures of themselves,” adding that “when I’m not entertaining, I flip over the top layer of photos to prevent fading,” she said.

As an art school graduate, McMillin has always had an affinity for film photography.

“Everything is so digitized nowadays and I hate the thought of printed/tangible pictures in the home becoming a thing of the past,” she said. “I keep regular photo albums as well, but Polaroids are an elite breed of photographs that deserve to be left out for the world to enjoy. Plus, they’re so aesthetically pleasing that incorporating them into my home décor just felt like a no-brainer.”

As for other simple home décor tips, McMillin believes that homes can be beautifully designed without an “outrageous” price tag.

“I find the easiest way to achieve this is through thrifting/vintage shopping and slowly curating your space with items that speak to you. Some of my favorite items in our house I’ve found at Goodwill, garage sales, or in my Grandmother’s basement,” she said.

Photographs scattered on a table.
A stock image of photographs scattered around a cup of tea. A video of a simple home decoration idea using Polaroids has gone viral online.

iStock / Getty Images Plus

‘Such a Great Idea’

Users on TikTok and Instagram adored the latest home décor tip.

The Brand5 wrote on TikTok: “This is such a cute idea!”

TikToker Lilly said: “Totally doing this for my hosting era.”

Instagram user @artbylmc said: “Such a great idea! I love Polaroids but never know how to display them in a way that doesn’t scream ‘college dorm.'”

User @kianajb wrote on Instagram: “Omg I’m going to put my wedding photos in here!!! Thank you for the idea.”

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